Blue-throated macaw

Ara glaucogularis

Its appearance is very similar to the blue macaw, with very similar colouring in their plumage, although they can be distinguished by the presence of a blue spot on its throat, which led to its name.

Natural habit

Northern Bolivia

From the east of Panama and Trinidad south to Paraguay and Brazil.
  • Distribution / Resident
  • Breeding
  • Wintering
  • Subspecies

Risk level

  • Extint
  • Extint in the wild
  • Critically endangered
  • In Danger
  • Vulnerable
  • Near threatened
  • Minor concern
  • Insufficient data
  • Not evaluated
En perill crític

Taxonomy

Class
Aves
Order
Psittaciformes
Family
Psittacidae

Physical characteristics

600-1000
Birth Weight:
85
Up to 50 years

Biology

Habitat
Forest
Social life
Gregarious
Feeding
Frugivorous

Reproduction

Gestation
26-28
Days
Baby
2 a 5

Discover how they are

Biology

Description

Its appearance is very similar to the blue macaw, with very similar colouring in their plumage, although they can be distinguished by the presence of a blue spot on its throat, which led to its name.

Habitat

Its area of distribution is extremely restricted, as it only occupies the region of Llanos de Mojos, in north and east Bolivia. It lives in savannahs and floodable forests with tropical climates, generally at altitudes of 200 to 300 metres.

Feeding

It mainly eats fruits and seeds.

Reproduction

It nests in holes in trees with hard bark and in palms, generally between August and December—end of the dry season—in which it lays from two to five eggs that they incubate for 26 to 28 days.

Conduct

It has a basically gregarious behaviour like other macaws, although it breeds alone. It is resident and sedentary throughout its area of distribution.

Status and conservation programs

This species, one of the most endangered in the Psittacidae family, is critically endangered due to deforestation and capture for the illegal pet trade. Its future is not hopeful, as the 1000 or 1200 individuals counted at the beginning of the 1980s have today shrunk to some 150, an exceptionally worrisome decline. It is critically endangered today.

 

The Barcelona Zoo participates in this species’ EEP.

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