Black-and-red broadbill

Cymbirhynchus macrorhynchos

It lives in forest regions close to rivers, streams and flooded areas of Southeast Asia. It feeds on insects, such as grasshoppers, beetles and ants, as well as molluscs, crabs and small vertebrates. It may occasionally eat fruit, seeds and other vegetable matter. Both male and female build the pear-shaped nest, which hangs from the branch of a tree.

Natural habit

Southeast Asia

Black-and-red broadbill
  • Distribution / Resident
  • Breeding
  • Wintering
  • Subspecies

Risk level

  • Extint
  • Extint in the wild
  • Critically endangered
  • In Danger
  • Vulnerable
  • Near threatened
  • Minor concern
  • Insufficient data
  • Not evaluated
Preocupació menor

Taxonomy

Class
Aves
Order
Passeriformes
Family
Eurylaimidae

Physical characteristics

50-76,5 kg
Birth Weight:
20 - 24 cm
More than 5 years

Biology

Habitat
Forest
Social life
Solitary
Feeding
Insectivorous

Reproduction

Gestation
15-20
Days
Baby
2 to 3

Discover how they are

Biology

Description

Black-and-red broadbills are robust birds with a very wide bill, with the top mandible a bright blue and the bottom yellow. The head, back and tail are black and the throat and belly are violet. The black wings have a white longitudinal line, highly visible and striking when the bird is in flight.

Habitat

They inhabit wooded regions close to rivers, streams and flooded areas in Southeast Asia.
 

Feeding

They feed on small invertebrates, primarily insects like locusts, beetles and ants, although they also eat molluscs, water snakes and small crabs. They may occasionally eat some fruit, seed or other plant matter.

Reproduction

Both the male and female build the nest, which consists of a structure made of grasses, twigs, leaves, fungus, mosses and other materials that are all interwoven into a pear shape that hangs from a tree branch and opens to the outside via a hole. The female lays two or three eggs in the nest, which are incubated for 15 to 20 days.

Conduct

Resident and sedentary.

Status and conservation programs

It is not endangered at present, although there have been steep reductions in numbers in recent years throughout almost its entire area of distribution due to the destruction of its habitat.