Blue-crowned motmot

Momotus momota

This bird covers a large area of distribution, which goes from the south of Mexico to the north of Argentina, where it lives in diverse habitats from sea level to up to 3,000 metres in altitude. It feeds primarily on invertebrates, preferably beetles, although it also eats fruits, small reptiles and occasionally chicks.

 

It builds its nests in holes and both members of the couple take part in incubating the eggs and in looking after the chicks.

Natural habit

All kinds of habitats in the Amazon forest

Blue-crowned motmot
  • Distribution / Resident
  • Breeding
  • Wintering
  • Subspecies

Risk level

  • Extint
  • Extint in the wild
  • Critically endangered
  • In Danger
  • Vulnerable
  • Near threatened
  • Minor concern
  • Insufficient data
  • Not evaluated
Preocupació menor

Taxonomy

Class
Aves
Order
Coraciiformes
Family
Momotidae

Physical characteristics

100-160 g
Birth Weight:
38-43 cm
Up to 20 years

Biology

Habitat
Jungle
Social life
Solitary
Feeding
Insectivorous

Reproduction

Gestation
21
Days
Baby
2 to 4

Discover how they are

Biology

Description

This colourful mid-sized bird is generally about 40 cm long and has general green colouring, although its belly has an olive tone that turns toward brown on the head and throat. It has a conspicuous blue and turquoise crown that covers a black band, just like the mask that covers its eyes and part of the cheeks. At the end of its tail, the green changes to blue, and this long tail is narrow until the end, at which it is capped by a racquet like tip that holds two blue and black feathers.

Habitat

It occupies an extensive area of distribution, ranging from southern Mexican to the north of Argentina, where it lives in diverse habitats from sea level to 3000 metres of altitude.

Feeding

It primarily feeds on invertebrates, with a predilection for beetles, although it also eats fruits, small reptiles and even chicks at times.

Reproduction

It nests in holes in cliffs, with both members of the pair incubating the eggs and caring for the chicks. Indeed, its breeding season starts around September, laying three eggs that are incubated from 29 to 32 days, although this can vary depending on the latitude and microclimate where it nests.

Conduct

Resident and solitary throughout its distribution area, it is quite sociable, despite the fact that it is solitary and rarely forms associations larger than a single pair.

Status and conservation programs

It is not endangered and can be quite common and abundant locally. The loss of habitat is the main cause of danger for this species in most of its distribution area.