Emperor tamarin

Saguinus imperator

The emperor tamarin, easily distinguishable for its long white moustache, can be found in the rainforests of south-eastern Peru, north-western Bolivia and north-western Brazil.

 

It has exclusively arboreal habits and eats all kinds of fruits, leaves and tender sprouts, although it also captures insects and small vertebrates.

 

Its populations are currently in regression due to the destruction of its habitat.

Breeding program

EPP - Zoo Barcelona

Natural habit

South-eastern Peru, north-western Bolivia and north-western Brazil.

Emperor tamarin
  • Distribution / Resident
  • Breeding
  • Wintering
  • Subspecies

Risk level

  • Extint
  • Extint in the wild
  • Critically endangered
  • In Danger
  • Vulnerable
  • Near threatened
  • Minor concern
  • Insufficient data
  • Not evaluated
Preocupació menor

Taxonomy

Class
Mammalia
Order
Primates
Family
Callithricidae

Physical characteristics

400-550 g
Birth Weight: 30-40 g
35-42 cm
More than 15 years in captivity

Biology

Habitat
Jungle
Social life
Gregarious
Feeding
Omnivorous

Reproduction

Gestation
140-145
Days
Baby
2, rarely 1 o 3

Discover how they are

Biology

Description

This tamarin, with greyish to brownish fur and orange tail, is easily distinguishable for its long white moustache, present in both sexes.

Habitat

Primary and secondary lowland and lower montane rainforests, occurring seasonally in flooding forests.

Feeding

It is omnivore and eats all kinds of fruits, leaves flowers, nectar, sap and tender sprouts, although it also captures insects and small vertebrates.

Reproduction

Gestation lasts for 145 days and one or two infants are born each time, exceptionally three, which are carried on the back by the father after breastfeeding, every two or three hours.

Conduct

Diurnal and exclusively arboreal, it lives in family groups of three to fifteen individuals, generally with more than one adult male and with a single reproductive female. Often, mixed groups are formed with other tamarin species, in order to help each other spot predators. While the emperor tamarin seems to be more skilled at spotting air predators, other tamarins appear more suited to detect earthbound predators. It is a territorial animal that defends territories of 30 to 40 hectares, against other groups.

Status and conservation programs

Its populations are currently in regression due to the accelerated destruction of its rainforests.

 

The Zoo of Barcelona takes part in the EEP of this species.