Golden-headed lion tamarin

Leontopithecus chrysomelas

The golden-headed tamarin occupies a small part of the Atlantic rainforest of the state of Bahia, in south-eastern Brazil, although it can also be spotted in dense cocoa plantations within the same region.

 

Nowadays it is critically endangered as a result of the destruction of rainforests and excessive hunting.

Breeding program

EPP - Zoo Barcelona

Natural habit

State of Bahia, in the Atlantic coast of south-eastern Brazil.

Golden-headed lion tamarin
  • Distribution / Resident
  • Breeding
  • Wintering
  • Subspecies

Risk level

  • Extint
  • Extint in the wild
  • Critically endangered
  • In Danger
  • Vulnerable
  • Near threatened
  • Minor concern
  • Insufficient data
  • Not evaluated
En perill

Taxonomy

Class
Mammalia
Order
Primates
Family
Callithricidae

Physical characteristics

480-700 g
Birth Weight: 50-60 g
33-39 cm
More than 20 years in captivity

Biology

Habitat
Jungle
Social life
Gregarious
Feeding
Omnivorous

Reproduction

Gestation
125-132
Days
Baby
2, rarely 1 o 3

Discover how they are

Biology

Description

The lion tamarin is named after its prominent mane around its head. In this species, the mane is golden, as well as the tip of the tail and arms, while the rest of the body, tail and face are black.

Habitat

Rainforests of the Atlantic coast.

Feeding

Its diet is omnivorous and eats fruits, flowers, nectar and small animals, such as arthropods, worms, snails, frogs, lizards, small snakes and bird eggs.

Reproduction

Usually twins are born, which are looked after cooperatively by all the members of the group, thus reducing the mother’s fatigue and assuring a better chance for the survival of the infant. 

Conduct

It has diurnal and arboreal habits, living in small groups of less than nine individuals, that defend the territory.

 

It sleeps within holes in big trees, the presence of which constitutes a limitation for the populations, as it affects to the distances it has to travel, in the morning to reach the feeding areas and at night to return.

 

It has claw-shaped nails that help it grab to the vertical part of trunks and keep stability on small branches. As in the rest of tamarins, it moves on all fours and can jump from tree to tree.

Status and conservation programs

Nowadays it is critically endangered as a result of the destruction of Atlantic rainforests, which have been reduced to small isolated patches.

 

The Zoo of Barcelona takes part in the EEP of this species.