Patas monkey

Erythrocebus patas

The patas monkey lives in the savannahs and dry regions of an extensive area of Africa, in southern Sahara. It is a ground-dwelling animal that only climbs to trees to sleep and in case of danger. It is the fastest primate, as it can reach speeds of more than 50 km/h.

 

It lives in groups of up to thirty individuals, in which there is only one dominant male. The rest of the group consists of females, young ones and infants. It feeds on fruits, seeds, roots and leaves, as well as insects and small vertebrates.

Breeding program

ESB_Zoo_Captura

Natural habit

The Sahel area in southern Sahara, from Senegal, Guinea and Guinea Bissau until Ethiopia, Kenya and Tanzania.

Patas monkey
  • Distribution / Resident
  • Breeding
  • Wintering
  • Subspecies

Risk level

  • Extint
  • Extint in the wild
  • Critically endangered
  • In Danger
  • Vulnerable
  • Near threatened
  • Minor concern
  • Insufficient data
  • Not evaluated
Preocupació menor

Taxonomy

Class
Mammalia
Order
Primates
Family
Cercopithecidae

Physical characteristics

4-13 kg
Birth Weight: 400-600 g
48-72 cm
Up to 24 years in captivity

Biology

Habitat
Savannah
Social life
Gregarious
Feeding
Omnivorous

Reproduction

Gestation
160-170
Days
Baby
1

Discover how they are

Biology

Description

It is a thin and slender long-tailed guenon, distinguishable for its impressively long limbs. Its fur is reddish on the back and on the top of its head, while its underparts are whitish and its face black.

Habitat

Dry savannahs and semi-desert areas.

Feeding

It feeds on all kinds of fruits, seeds, roots, resins and acacia leaves, as well as insects and small vertebrates. It obtains the water it needs directly from food and it almost never drinks, which enables this species to occupy more arid regions than most of the other African primates.

Reproduction

Mating occurs at their place of origin, between mid-June and the end of August, with gestation lasting 160 to 170 days. Usually a single baby is born, which is carried by the mother during its first months of life, while clinging tightly to its belly.

Conduct

It is a ground-dwelling animal that only climbs to trees to sleep and in case of danger. It reaches a considerable size, as males can weigh up to 13 kg, although it moves nimbly on the ground. It is the fastest primate, as it can reach speeds of 56 km/h.

 

It forms groups of up to thirty individuals, in which there is only one dominant male and a number of adult females, ranging between three and twelve. The rest of the group consists of young monkeys and babies. They defend extensive territories of up to 52 km2 and almost never join other monkey species.

Status and conservation programs

Unlike most African primates, its populations are still quite abundant in many regions and currently it is not considered to be an endangered species.

The Zoo of Barcelona takes part in the ESB of this species.