Rosy-bellied pochard

Netta peposaca

The rosy-billed pochard breeds on lakes, lagoons and shallow reservoirs where there is thick vegetation in southern and central South America, from Bolivia and southern Brazil down to Tierra del Fuego, from sea level up to 1,200 metres.
It feeds mainly on aquatic plants and roots. It is often found on dry land, spending as much time there as on water. Rosy-bills are one of the commonest diving ducks in South America.

Natural habit

Southern Brazil, Uruguay, Paraguay, Chile and Argentina

South America
  • Distribution / Resident
  • Breeding
  • Wintering
  • Subspecies

Risk level

  • Extint
  • Extint in the wild
  • Critically endangered
  • In Danger
  • Vulnerable
  • Near threatened
  • Minor concern
  • Insufficient data
  • Not evaluated
Preocupació menor

Taxonomy

Class
Aves
Order
Anseriformes
Family
Anatidae

Physical characteristics

1000-1200 g
Birth Weight:
55-56 cm
Up to 10 years

Biology

Habitat
Wetlands
Social life
Gregarious
Feeding
Herbivorous

Reproduction

Gestation
27-29
Days
Baby
8 a 15 eggs

Discover how they are

Biology

Description

The rosy-billed pochard is a robust South American duck with clear sexual dimorphism: males are easily recognised by the dark plumage on the head, neck, chest and back, a light-grey tone on the sides and red eyes and bill, with a large red knob at its base. Females are brown with a greyish bill. Both have black-tipped bills.

Habitat

They inhabit lakes, swamps and freshwater marshes with abundant aquatic vegetation in the southern half of South America, from Paraguay and southern Brazil to central Chile and Argentina.

Feeding

Herbivores, they eat grass, tender shoots, seeds and the soft bits of aquatic plants, which they can consume on the surface or just under the water level.

Reproduction

They make nests with leaves, grass and twigs on the shores of bodies of water where there is a cover of vegetation, frequently using the nests that other species have made.

Conduct

Partially migratory, this species descends to lower latitudes during the coldest winter months.

Status and conservation programs

This species is still common in many well-conserved wetlands of their area of distribution. It is not in danger, although at some points of its area of distribution and due to the lack of habitable areas due to the destruction and desiccation of wetlands, they are becoming increasingly scarce. It is hunted and poisoned in some points of Brazil and Argentina, especially in rice paddies.