Spangled cotinga

Cotinga cayana

Spangled cotingas are striking tropical birds, living in the forests and jungles of the north of South America, from Venezuela and the Guyanas to Colombia, Bolivia and the Amazon region of Brazil.

 

It eats mainly fruit and the males and females are quite distinct: the males have spectacularly bright plumage, while the females are a much duller brownish colour.

Natural habit

North of South America, from Venezuela to Colombia and guava, Bolivia and the Amazon region of Brazil.

Spangled cotinga
  • Distribution / Resident
  • Breeding
  • Wintering
  • Subspecies

Risk level

  • Extint
  • Extint in the wild
  • Critically endangered
  • In Danger
  • Vulnerable
  • Near threatened
  • Minor concern
  • Insufficient data
  • Not evaluated
Preocupació menor

Taxonomy

Class
Aves
Order
Passeriformes
Family
Cotingidae

Physical characteristics

56-72 g
Birth Weight:
18 - 22 cm
More than 10 years

Biology

Habitat
Jungle
Social life
Gregarious
Feeding
Frugivorous

Reproduction

Gestation
23-25
Days
Baby
1 to 3

Discover how they are

Biology

Description

The Spangled cotinga is an eye-catching colourful tropical bird, essentially standing out due to its distinct sexual dimorphism:  males have spectacularly coloured plumage—blue and turquoise, with purple hues on the wings, tail and scapular feathers, with a bright purple gular area—while the females are much more discreet, a brownish colour with greys on the back and lighter brown on the dorsal and belly areas.

Habitat

They live in the forests and jungles of northern South America, from Venezuela and the Guianas to Colombia, Bolivia and the Amazon region of Brazil, up to altitudes of 600 metres. They rarely go higher than this.

Feeding

Fundamentally frugivorous, even though during breeding season it adds several insect species to its diet.

Reproduction

It nests in trees with some height, creating a cup shaped nest padded with all types of plant matter, where it lays a single egg that is incubated for no longer than 20 days.

Conduct

When a predator approaches the nest, cotingas fly up to the treetops, performing aerial acrobats and spreading their tails like a fan to attract the intruder and expel them. Their antics to distract intruders are conspicuous and simply wonderful.

 

It is resident and sedentary, although nomadic movements of this species are periodically seen in Venezuela, dependent on the climate and rainfall.

Status and conservation programs

It is not endangered and is abundant and common in forests and jungles in its entire area of distribution.