Superb fruit dove

Ptilinopus superbus

The superb fruit dove is a rainforest dove with significant sexual dimorphism: the female has green plumage with a white mark on the back of the head, while the male has a purple crown and orange neck. They lay a single egg which they both incubate, the male during the day and
the female at night.

Natural habit

Rainforests of New Guinea and Australia

Superb fruit dove
  • Distribution / Resident
  • Breeding
  • Wintering
  • Subspecies

Risk level

  • Extint
  • Extint in the wild
  • Critically endangered
  • In Danger
  • Vulnerable
  • Near threatened
  • Minor concern
  • Insufficient data
  • Not evaluated
Preocupació menor

Taxonomy

Class
Aves
Order
Columbiformes
Family
Columbidae

Physical characteristics

80-145 g
Birth Weight:
21-24 cm
Up to 10 years

Biology

Habitat
Forest
Social life
Solitary
Feeding
Frugivorous

Reproduction

Gestation
14
Days
Baby
1

Discover how they are

Biology

Description

The eastern superb fruit dove is a forest pigeon with marked sexual dimorphism:  the female has green plumage with a blue spot at the back of its head, while the male has a purple crown and orange nape.

Habitat

It occupies all types of forests, mangroves and farmlands with some tree cover in New Guinea and its surrounding islands and the east of Australia, from sea level to 2500 metres.

Feeding

It is essentially frugivorous. It forms large food groups often, mixed with other Columbidae species.
 

Reproduction

It builds a simple nest with branches and plant matter, in which it lays a single egg that both members of the pair incubate, the male during the day and the female at night, for some 14 days.

Conduct

The majority of this species' populations are resident and sedentary, although some subpopulations may be more nomadic.

Status and conservation programs

It is locally abundant and common in the majority of its area of distribution. In some areas, generally islands and isolated regions, it is endangered due to the destruction of its habitat.