Violet turaco

Musophaga violacea

Turacos are eye-catching jungle birds that are only found on the African continent. As a unique trait to this family, the plumage has two pigments that do not exist in any other bird: turacine (a red colour) and turacoverdin (a green colour). However, the violet turaco, or plantain-eater, is characterised by the general violet colour of its plumage, with an orange beak, a yellow forehead and a red crest.

Breeding program

ESB_Zoo_Captura

Natural habit

Jungles between Gambia and Nigeria.

Jungles between Gambia and Nigeria.
  • Distribution / Resident
  • Breeding
  • Wintering
  • Subspecies

Risk level

  • Extint
  • Extint in the wild
  • Critically endangered
  • In Danger
  • Vulnerable
  • Near threatened
  • Minor concern
  • Insufficient data
  • Not evaluated
Preocupació menor

Taxonomy

Class
Aves
Order
Cuculiformes
Family
Musophagidae

Physical characteristics

350-400 g
Birth Weight:
45-55
Up to 10 years

Biology

Habitat
Jungle
Social life
Solitary
Feeding
Herbivorous

Reproduction

Gestation
25-26
Days
Baby
2

Discover how they are

Biology

Description

Turacos are eye-catching jungle birds that are only found on the African continent. As a unique trait to this family, the plumage has two pigments that do not exist in any other bird: turacine (a red colour) and turacoverdin (a green colour). However, the violet turaco, or plantain-eater, is characterised by the general violet colour of its plumage, with an orange beak, a yellow forehead and a red crest.

Habitat

The violet turaco only lives in the jungles of West Africa, from southern Senegal to the Ivory Coast, Sierra Leone, Liberia and Nigeria, with small isolated populations in southern Chad and the north of the Central African Republic.

Feeding

Almost exclusively frugivorous, even when they are chicks, they form small groups to feed together in the same jungle area..

Reproduction

The breeding season starts around April, especially in Senegal and Gambia, while in Nigeria it is between June and October. It builds its nest with twigs and small branches similar to those of Colimbidae, normally in trees some six metres from the ground with dense leaves and good arboreal coverage, in which it lays two white eggs that both members of the pair incubate for 25 or 26 days
 

Conduct

It is probably a sedentary species, although some populations must move to disperse for variable periods of time, although it cannot be considered migratory in any way.

Status and conservation programs

Like all jungle birds, it is endangered today mainly because of the deforestation of its habitat. In countries like Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia and Ghana, they are highly sought after for illegal pet trafficking.

 

The Barcelona Zoo participates in the European Studbook (ESB) for this species in captivity.